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October 13, 2006

Comments

bls

This is a wonderful story, I agree. God bless Muhammed Yunus.

It's not only church people, I'm afraid, who should be ashamed. Americans in general (maybe all Westerners) seem to be really out of touch with the difficult lives of people elsewhere. We're all living in a bubble here, obsessed with our own silly "problems" - fiddling like Nero while Rome burns. We're self-absorbed aristocrats who aren't even aware of how rich and pampered we are.

Church people have less excuse for this, of course.

Kiran

When a person is working toward the greater good of humanity what does it matter what religion he is?

Why are you comparing Prof. Yunn to religious virtues? In essence they are universal virtues and there is no need to put a religious label on it.

It irritates me that Christians feel that "they" should have been the ones to come up with this glorious plan to help end world poverty; it is as if you people have no faith in other beings of different faiths.

I think it is outrageous, unnecessary, and disrespectful to Prof Muhammad Yunn for his plan of social and economic development to be linked to religion.

People of all religions essentially strive for the same common good, so you Christians should not feel like your doing something different or special; and it is not your own soul responsibility.

D. C.

Kiran, thanks for commenting. I fear you've misread my posting. I don't claim that Christians "should have been the ones to come up with this glorious plan to help end world poverty." Neither do I link Prof. Yunus's achievements to religion. His name manifestly indicates his Muslim origins, but that's all I've said about it; I've made no claim about his personal religious beliefs, if any. Finally, Christians (or at least most of us) emphatically do not "have no faith in other beings of different faiths" as you say.

My point was simply this: In recent years, Episcopalians and Anglicans have been spending a great deal of time, talent, and treasure on bitter in-fighting about sexuality. How much better if we had devoted those resources to helping address the root causes of poverty, as Professor Yunus (not "Yunn") has so laudably done.

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Kiran says that religious virtues in essence "are universal virtues and there is no need to put a religious label on it." He also says that "[p]eople of all religions essentially strive for the same common good, so you Christians should not feel like your doing something different or special; and it is not your own soul [sic] responsibility."

I have a slightly different view, for a couple of reasons.

First: Labeling a virtue as "religious" usually makes a statement about the people who practice it, not about the virtue itself. If most Christians try to practice a particular virtue most of the time, then we call the virtue a Christian one. If most Hindus, Muslims, and Jews also try to practice the same virtue, then the virtue is likewise a Hindu one and a Muslim one and a Jewish one. (It's not unlike Flickr or del.icio.us allowing you to tag a single picture or a single Web page with multiple tags — doing so doesn't alter the picture or the Web page at all.)

Second: We can hardly speak of "universal" virtues. No matter what virtue you pick, by no means do all people practice it, and hardly anyone practices it all the time.

(In statistical terms, what we call religious virtues do seem to represent the mean for humanity; this may be because on balance, people and groups who behave in ways that we call virtuous seem to have a long-term evolutionary advantage over others. But the behavioral data are scattered all over the place; the standard deviation from the mean is not inconsiderable.)

In any case, Kiran, thanks for taking the time to leave your comment.

logix

actually it's a basic fundemental of Islam mentioned in the Quran that the obligation of a Muslim is to help the oppressed, poor, women, and orphans. But of course, some Muslims don't even know the teaching of the Quran as some Christians who dont even know the teaching of the Gospel.

Anjaan Ahmed

Hello, Guys please clam down, HINDU, MUSLIM, CHRISTIAN or Others , no matter who you're no matter where you're from, Just beleive that we are Human being, and our Creator , I beleive on "ALLAH" You Beleive on "JESSUS" and others Beleive on "BHOGOBAN" same person diffrent name and way to beleive and pray


Good Bless all

Thank You

Anjaan Ahmed

New York -USA

templar

"Muhammad Yunus's first name suggests that he's of Muslim origin. As have other non-Christians, he would seem to exemplify following the Great Commandment and Summary of the Law".

I agree on both counts - his name and his evident virtue. But let's not try to infer anything about Islam or his relationship to it just from these facts alone. It would appear that his efforts have faced considerable opposition from the Islamic establishment in Bangladesh. Very sad.

fyi:

https://www.grameen-info.org/mcredit/weapon.html

Weiwen Ng

"Anyone can be a "Christian," no matter what his or her particular beliefs. "

Well said!! I am a fan of the artist Br Robert Lentz, who has done a number of Byzantine-style icons with often very unusual subjects. One such subject is Mohandas Gandhi (the icon is available here: https://www.trinitystores.com/main.php4?detail=44&artist=1). Joan Chittister, who co-wrote one book with Lentz, said that it took a Hindu to show the Christians what Christianity was all about.

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